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Pages 29-36

EARLES OF ENGLAND_DORSETSHIRE~ Page 29
CHAPTER FOUR~
THE EARLES OF DORSETSHIRE.
If we are right in our identification of John Erie, of Ashburton,
and our London author is correct in his statements, we shall have
plain sailing in giving the genealogy of the Dorsetshire branch. This
begins with Walter Erie, of Charborough, and the descent is as fol-
lows:
N_FOURTEENTH GENERATION.

CHILDREN OF JOHN ERLE (M 2), OF CULHAMPTON,
DEVONSHIRE, d. 1508, son of John Erie (L 2), of Ashburton,
  1. 1484, and Margaret de Sondes:
N 1) JOHN ERLE, of Cuihampton, married Thomasine Beare,
of County Somerset.

0_FIFTEENTH GENERATION.

CHILDREN OF JOHN ERLE (N 1), OF CULHAMPTON, AND
THOMASINE BEARE:
0 1) WALTER ERLE, of Charborough, County Dorset; d.
1581; married Mary, daughter and co-heir of Richard
Wykes, of Binden and Charborough; founder of the Dor-
setshire branch.

A quaint bit of old-time history is here transcribed from Pole’s
“Collections for Devon :“ “Bindon, in Axmouth, was sometime the
dwelling of Nicholas Bach, and by him sold in Kinge Henry 4 tyme
unto Roger Wike; it contynewed in the famyly, and the last of them,
Riciard Wike, left it unto his foure daughters, wief of Antony Giffard,
Alis (Alice), wief of Hugh Barry, wief of Mark Hays, and Mary,
wief of Walter Erie, which bought Giffard’s part, and so the moytye
(half) is descended unto Sir Walter Earle, sonne of
and Dorothie, his wief, daughter of William Pole, of Shute, Esq.
Theire hath the said Sir Walter Erie his howse, with fayre demesnes
thereunto belonginge, with the parsonage impropriat.”
There is a conflict of authorities just here which we are not able to
determine. The bit of history just quoted is supposed to describe the
beginning of the Earle family in Dorset, yet Pole says that Bindon,



EARLE'S OF ENGLAND—DORSETSHIRE Page 30

which came to Walter Erie through his marriage with Mary Wyke,
was in Axmouth, and Axmouth in Devon. Another writer says that
Binden and Charborough were both in Dorset. The genealogy as given
by Hutchins says, that Walter Erie purchased the manor of Axmouth,
in Devon, on the suppression of the Abbey of Syon. The present
writer’s information is defective at this point. The only ground he is
sure of is that Charborough, in Dorsetshire. became the home of Wal-
ter Erie and his descendants. The family of Walter Erle was as fol-
lows:

P—SIXTEENTH GENERATION.
CHILDREN OF WALTER ERLE (0 1), OF CHARBOROUGH.
d. 1581, AND MARY, daughter of Richard Wykes. of Bindon and
Charborough:
P 1) THOMAS ERLE, ESQ.
P 2) HONOR ERLE.
P 3) BRIDGET ERLE.
P 4) MARY ERLE.
Walter Erie’s son and heir was Thomas Erie, Esq., of Charbor-
ough. His family was as follows:

Q—SEVENTEENTH GENERATION.
CHILDREN OF THOMAS ERLE (P 1), OF CHARBOROUGH,
d. March 16, 1597; married Dorothy. daughter of William Pole,
of Culhampton, Devon:
Q 1) SIR WALTER ERLE, of Charborough, b~ 1586, d. 1665;
m. Ann, daughter of Francis Dymock, Kt., of County
Warwick.
Q 2) CHRISTOPHER ERLE, of Sturminster Marshal, Dorset.
Q 3) JOHN ERLE, died young.
Q 4) THOMAS ERLE, died young. Buried East Morden
Church, 1592.
Q 5) DOROTHY ERLE.
Q 6) ELIZABETH ERLE, married Sir Richard Strode, of
Newenham, County Devon.
Thomas Erie, Esq. (P 1). was buried in the church of East
Morden, which stands at the west end of the parish, and is an ancient
hut not large building. .


EARLES OF ENGLAND DORSETSHIRE ~ Page 31
MONUMENT TO THOMAS ERLE, ESQ.
Under the east window of the chancel is a monument of free-
stone, having under a circular pediment the figure of a man in com-
plete armor, kneeling on one knee, his hands elevated. Behind him
are two boys with a girl between them, in the dress of that age. In
the centre of the pediment are the arms of Erie, in a bordure engrailed
three escallops, impaling a lion rampant between three fleur de us. Its
architecture and sculpture are both of a rude character. The fol-
lowing inscription is at the back:

INSCRIPTION.

Here liethe buryed the boddye of Thomas Earle, the
sone of Walter Earle, whoe departed from this lyff the
16 daye of Marche in the yeare of our Lorde God 1597.
Hi~ sons wer 4, his daughters 2, of who me John,
Thomas and DoritJie are desecid, and remayneth now
livynge Waltar, Christopher, and Elizabethe.

REGISTER OF~EAST MORDEN VUUKCK
Register begins in 1575.
BAPTISMS.
Thomas, son of Sir Thomas Erie, March 5, 1620.
BVRIALS.
Walter Erie, ~ 1581.
Thomas, son of Thomas Erie, Esq., 1592.
Thomas Erie, of Charborough, Esq., March 22, 1597.
The next name in the history is that of Sir Walter Erie, son and
heir of Thomas Erie, Esq., of Charborough, who attained to consid-
erable distinction.
R_EIGHTEENTII GENERATION.
CHILDREN OF SIR WALTER ERLE (Q 1), OF CHARBOR-
OUGH, KNT., “Aet. 10, 22 Nov., 1596.” Buried at Charborough,
Sep. 1, 1665; married Ann, daughter of Francis Dymock, County
Warwick, Knight. Ann died Jan. 26, 1653; buried at Axmouth,
Devon. There were three children:
• R 1) THOMAS ERLE, ESQ., of Charborough, b. 1621, d.1650.


 EARLES OF ENGLAND—DORSETSHIRE Page 32

R 2) ANNE ERLE, married Norton, of Co. Hants,
Esq.
R 3) HONOR ERLE, married John Giffard, of Brightly,
Devon.
Of Sir Walter Erie (Q 1), Hume says: “He was one of the first
patriots of the English Revolution of 1649.”
Dr. Pliny Earle says: “He was one of the five Knights who re-
sisted the encroachments of Charles the First upon the rights of his
subjects, a more or less detailed account of which is given by Rush-
worth, Hume and Hallam, in their histories of England.”
‘~The Commons having failed to pass a bill for subsidies, the King
was left without supplies. He demanded a general loan, for the rais-
ing of which each person was to be assessed according to his rate in
the next previous subsidy; and appointed a commission to have charge
of the business. The common people who refused to contribute to the
loan were impressed for service in the navy; the gentry were bound in
recognizances to appear at the Council table, and were committed to
prison. ‘Five gentlemen alone,’ says Hume, ‘had spirit enough to
defend the public liberties, and to demand releasement, not as a favor
from the court, but as their due by the laws of their country.’ One
of these, as already intimated, was Sir Walter Erie. They sued out
writs of habeas corpus from the Court of King’s Bench, and, at the
michaelmas term of that court, in the third year of the reign of the
King, the warden of the Fleet prison, who held them in custody, made
return for each one of them, under a common form, of which that of
Sir Walter was as follows:
‘That Sir Walter Earl, Knight, named in the writ,
is detained in the prison of the Fleet, in his custody, by
special command of the King, to him signified by war-
rant of several of the Privy Council, in these words:
Whereas Sir Walter Earl, Knight, was heretofore com-
mitted to your custody; These are to will and to require
you still to detain, letting you know that both his first
commitment, and direction for the continuance of him in
prison, were and are by his Majesty’s special command-
ment.”
Thomas Coventry.
From Whitehall, Nov. 7, 1627.”

“The prisoners were remanded to the custody of the Fleet. On


EARLES OF ENGLAND—DORSETSHIRE Page 33

the 29th of January, next following, it was decided by the King’s
Council to call a Parliament. The Parliament was held in March,
162$, and the prisoners were released.
‘It is to the discussion which arose out of the case of these five gen-
tlemen,”. writes Rushworth (Historical Collections, Vol. I.), “that we
owe the continual assertion, by Parliament, of the fundamental im-
munity of English subjects from arbitrary detention, and its ultimate
establishment by the Statute of Charles the Second.”
“This statute, ‘for the better securing the liberty of the subject,’
was passed May 27, 1679, and was called the ‘Subjects’ Writ of
Right.’: It was founded on the old common law, and is next in im-
t~ortance to ‘Magna Charta; for, under it, ‘No subject of England can
be detained in prison, except in cases where the detention is shown
to be justified by law.’ Not alone every Englishman, but every Amer-
ican as. well, who appreciates the value of the safe-guards of his lib-
erty and. his rights,, is obligated in gratitude to Sir Walter and his
four companions for that heroic conduct in defiance of their Sovereign,
which was the initiatory act leading to the permanent establishment of
the right to the Writ of H~bea~ Corpus, and a test of the legality of
imprisonment before a court of competent jurisdiction.”
We will dismiss this distinguished kinsman with a remark of
Burke’s, from his Baronetage and Peerage: “In the great Ci~~il War,
Sir Walter Erie, of Charborough, was a distinguished Parliament-
arian.”
The Dorsetshire family divides at this point into two parallel
streams, the descendants. of Sir Walter, and the descendants of his
brother Christopher. As the latter soon divides again, giving rise to the
Essex branch, it may be better to consider it by itself in another chap-
ter. For the present we follow the line of Sir Walter’s descendants.
Sir Walter Erie (Q 1) and his wife, Ann Dymock, had three chil-
dren whose names are given. Anne (R 2) married a gentleman of
Hamshire named Norton, and Honor (R 3) married John Giffard,
of Brightly, Devonshire. Nothing further is known about them. The
family of the son, Thomas, is now given:

S—NINETEENTH GENERATION.

CHILDREN OF THOMAS ERLE,’. ESQ., OF CHARBOROUGH
(R 1).; Aet. 2 in 1623; died June 1, 1650; married Susanna, 4th
daughter of William, Viscount Saye and Sele; had two Sons and
two daughters:





 EARLES OF ENGLAND—DORSETSHIRE Page 34

S 1) WALTER ERLE, ESQ.
S 2) GENERAL THOMAS ERLE, of Charborough.
S 3) A daughter, name not given.
S 4) A daughter, name not given.
Of the grandson of Sir Walter. \Válter Erie, Esq. (S 1), we know
but little. He married Ann, daughter of Thomas Trenchard, of Wol-
verton, Esq.
The second grandson, General Thomas Erie (S 2), reached some
eminence in the British military service. Burke, in his Dictionary,
speaks of him as “The famous Lieutenant General of the Ordnance,
commander of the center of the English army at the battle of Alman-
za, Spain, grandson and heir of Sir Walter Erie, of Charborough.
the Parliamentarian.”
“Almanza was a small town of New Castle, Spain, and only fa-
mous in history for the battle fought there in 1707. The combined
Spanish and French forces were victorious over the English and
Portuguese allies, on account of the Portuguese horse deserting the
English at the beginning of the action, forcing the latter to bear the
whole brunt of the attack, which they could not do, and were conse-
quently defeated.”
The family of General Thomas is as follows:

T—TWENTIETII GENERATION.

CHILDREN OF GENERAL THOMAS ERLE (S 2), OF CHAR-
BOROUGH; died 1720; married Elizabeth, 2nd daughter of Wil-
liam Wyndham, of Orchard Wyndham. County Somerset, Bart;
one daughter, only child and heiress.
T 1) FRANCES ERLE.

U—TWENTY-FIRST GENERATION.

FAMILY OF FRANCES ERLE (T 1), sole child and heiress of
General Thomas Erie (S 2); died at ~1addington, 1728; buried at
Charborough; married Sir Edward Ernlv, of Maddington, Co.
Wilts. Bart. One daughter and only child:
U 1) FRANCES ELIZABETH, married Henry Drax, Esq.

V—TWENTY-SECOND GENERATION.

FAMILY OF FRANCES ELIZABETH ERNLY (U 1), daughter
and heir of Sir Edward Ernly. (The genealogy states that U 1 and
her mother, T 1, died in 1728). Married Henry Drax, of Ellerton






EARLES OF ENGLAND—DORSETSHIRE page 35

Abbey, York, Esq., (d. 1755); there were nine children, as follows:
V 1) THOMAS ERLE DRAX, ESQ., born 1729; died 1790,
aged 67; married Mary, daughter of Lord St. John, of
Bletsoe. Mary died March 17, 1785.
V 2) EDWARD DRAX, ESQ., of Milcombe Regis.
V 3) FRANCES ELIZABETH, married (1st) Augustus, Earl
of Berkeley; m. (2nd) Robert, Viscount Clare. She died
June 29, 1792.
V 4) MARY, married John Durbin, Esq., of Bristol.
V 5) HARRIOT, married Sir William Hanhan, of Dean’s
Court, 4th Bart. She died April 2, 1786.
V 6) SUSANNAH, married (1st) William Crocroft, Esq. M.
(2nd) in 1777, John Touchet, Earl of Castiehaven, Ire-
land, Baron Audley of England. Died July 31, 1789.
V 7) FRANCES, died 1751.
V 8) Infant daughter.
V 9) Infant daughter.

W—TWENTY-THIRD GENERATION.
FAMILY OF EDWARD DRAX (V 2), ESQ., OF MILCOMBE
REGIS; married, April 16. 1762, Mary, daughter of Awrsham
Churchill, of Henbury, Esq. Died at Knowle. Dec. 3, 1820, ag~ed
  1. (The last date probably refers to Mary):
W 1) SARAH FRANCES, only daughter and heiress.

X—TWENTY-FOTJRTH GENERATION.

FAMILY OF SARAH FRANCES DRAX (W 1), great-great-grand-
daughter of General Thomas Erie (S 2); died June 15, 1822; mar-
ried, March 11, 1788, Richard Grosvenor, Esq., M. P. for West
Looe and Chester; assumed the name of Erie Drax. (d. Feb. 8,
1819). Three children:
X 1) JANE FRANCES ERLE DRAX. born Dec. 25, 1788.
X 2) LOUISA ERLE DRAX, died young.
X 3) RICHARD EDWARD ERLE DRAX, born March, 1797;
died unmarried, August 18, 1828.

Y—TWENTY-FIFTH GENERATION.

FAMILY OF JANE FRANCES ERLE DRAX (X 1), born Dec.
25. 1788: died December 29. 1853: buried at Charborough: married





 EARLES OF ENGLAND—DORSETSHIRE Page 36

May 1, 1827, John Samuel Wanlev Sawbridge. (Assumed the name
of Erle-Drax; born October 6, 1800) ; issue, two daughters:
Y 1) MARIA CAROLINE ERLE DRAX.
Y ~) SARAH FRANCES ELIZABETH ERLE DRAX.

Z—TWENTY-SIXTII GENERATION.

FAMILY OF SARAH FRANCES ELIZABETH ERLE DRAX (Y
2); married. Sept. 14. 1853, Col. Francis Augustus Plunkett Bur-
ton, of the Coidstream Guards (d. 1867). Issue, a daughter:
Z 1) A daughter, name not given.
We thus find the line of Sir Walter Erie Q 1) through his grand-
son, General Thomas Erie (S 2), terminating in a female repre-
sentative, and the name lost except as it was assumed in the form of
Erle-Drax. Whether there are any living descendants of Sir Walter.
bearing the family name, \VC do not know, although it is possible, as
there was another grandson of Sir \Valter. Walter Erie. Esq. (S 1).
who may have left descendants.
It is interesting to find on the Clergy List for 1912, Kelly’s Direc-
tories, London, the names of a father and two sons, who are direct
descendants of Walter Erie (0 1). of Charborough, d. 1581, the
founder of the Dorsetshire family. They are. Rev. Walter Earle,
made priest in 1866, Redgate House. Reigate. Surrey; Rev. Ernest
Henry Earle, priest in 1903, Belton Grange, Rugby; Rev. Granville
Earle, deacon in 1911. Whether these are descended through Sir
\Valter or his brother, Christopher, we can not say.

 

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Additional Earle History dating back to 1166
To show the Dedication and Love Elizabeth "Libby Earle has for her Family and Heritage, when she found out she had relatives in England and a Statue bearing her exact name, Elizabeth "Libby" left on an unknown adventure and the below is the reply letter from her trip and one hour visit with H.W. Drax in England. Once home and locating a copy of the Earle's of Secaucus she had mailed H.D Drax about questions on pages 29-36 shown below.
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               EARLE'S OF SECAUCUS
History and Genealogy - Dating back to 1166
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